Placement week 2

Making-  a zip up bag is my first creation, i felt a real sense of achievement and satisfaction, knowing that i can make quality products to be sold in store gives me a new found sense of confidence!

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I then progressed on to hat making,  creating an adele cap from start to finish, Along side a neck wrap both in store ready to be sold!

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Research- I was also involved in sourcing inspiartion and research by looking through magazines such as ‘oh comely’ and ‘the hat’ which resulted in a ‘ summer icecream’ hat collection that refelcted the pastel icecream colour palletes such as strawberry pink, minty green, bluberry grey and lemon sorbey yellow!

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Styling- it was then a case of styling the accesories to symbolise and give relevance to the concept. Teaming the hats with corresponding items and a simple summery glass&straw combo to complete the look! I found it was an enjoyable exercise and taught me a lot about composition through the eyes of a client!

pricing/market- chrissie gave me quite an in depth overlook on pricing items, comparing highstreet to bespoke, mass production to one offs and mass market to, in this case, a woman with singular tastes, stating that in her case a woman usually needs confidence and perhaps doesnt mind attention when wearing her items, specifically hats! Comparing both niche and high end markets, and for a designer maker charging by the hour + time + materials.

Placement week 1

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The welcome- I had a very warm welcome and instantly felt comfortable within this unique little shop in which i call my new work environment. At present i am learning how high quality design and craft is achieved!

Customer profile- I was instantly able to observe how chrissie dealt with clients, watching how she spoke in a friendly manner, offering advice and direction. Stating how someone with a pink complection would better suit cooler colours in a hat such as blues and purples, as it distracts from a flushed face, such details were things that i hadnt considered when selecting accessories and gave me insight into not just buyer/seller communication but how design is influenced by customer profile analysis.

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Practical making- I was also so excited to start the process of making! As a surface design student i am naturally drawn to pattern and fabric design which results mostly in samples and experimenting, so as of yet i havent had the opportunity to practically develop my samples into a product! Part of this placement ensures i learn the process of making, pattern cutting and construction specifically hats and accessories!!

Let’s make glass!

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I took up an opportunity to take part in a glass making course, something that took my mind off of all the deadline work due, yet still held that creative element which helps me unwind. The process was simple so it was a relaxing activity being able to piece together the glass frit and confetti, experimenting with colour, texture and scale. While i enjoyed this it was great being able to learn a new skill! I’ve documented a detailed process in my technical file.

Wellbeing writeup

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There is a lot of historical research on wellbeing within textiles, for example; an exhibition at the V&A displayed quilts that had been developed by soldiers injured in the war as a form of healing and therepy, suggesting that making these quilts was a process of recovery by being time consuming and a viable distraction.
Leslie Cole looked into the effect of stitch calming those within prisoner of war camp.
Daisy Sage is known for secretly stitching over 1000 names onto a bed sheet during the war,  not with any purpose in mind, it was simply occupying her. The piece can be viewed now, and whist not necessarily aesthetically pleasing, its the ora around it and the history it symbolises.
Elizabeth fry ( the lady you see on a £5 note) understood the importance of the relationship between hand and mind, providing female convicts with sewing kits as a means to focus and occupy time, the modern day version of this is an organisation named fine cell work who offer prisoners in confinement sewing classes, which in turn had a relaxing calming effect.
To be able to see the effects on well being and happiness we need to be able to measure it. A report on happiness suggested that job security,  a stable family life, and relationships make for a happier person! 
As well as embroidery,  knitting has shown positive effects on dementia paitents, as knitting is bilateral (using both sides on the brain). Hilary Jones, a behavioural scientist found 25 ways in which knitting can help dementia patients,  a few of these consist of a confidance in participating in group activities,  an increase in relaxation and a focus and purpose for each day. This leads to advantages in practice based research, learning through making.

The knitting and stitching show

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I was so overwhelmed to be one of the selected few to represent my university at knit&stitch this year! I selected a range of both my hand and machine embroidery samples to showcase in order to show the range we offer, I was alongside other selected students that were equally passionate about their chosen specialism. I recieved a lot of positive feedback and  experience gained from talking to other exhibitors and visitors. As a student who often went to the knitting and stitching show as a visitor it was extremely exciting yet strange for me to attend as an exhibitor. 

Week -9 – Sustainability

Sustainability

The idea of being ‘sustainable’ comes from the industrial revolution and the need to create products faster, cheaper and bigger in scale, which in turn impacts the environment, energy, power, workers and waste. What is unsustainable within design? Dying, is a major factor in the pollution of water, manufacturing causes many ethical issues in terms of cheap labour and the exploitation of workers, these are just a few of the examples of unsustainability within design.

In the design industry, the most damaging part of the design/product life cycle is the consumer use section, with clothing items being washed and re-washed over a long period of time, this is what effects the environment the most. How can this be changed? Is the solution to create short term clothing items with a short term life span, or will this affect the ‘end of life’ section of the product life cycle with a rise in throw away items? Each section of the design life cycle has elements that can be changed in order to make them more sustainable.

The idea of upcycling and recycling textiles is what intrigues me the most, it re-evaluates the idea that manufacturing could be reduced if we re-invented or manipulated already existing products. Artists such as Karen Jessen and Tara booth Mooney adopt this approach.  The idea of designing for empathy involves changing a piece of clothing for someone who already has a significant emotional attachment to that item, for example; modernising a wedding dress that has been passed down as a keepsake, or transforming a dress into a bag to make it more tangible or long-lasting.